Moving to Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 1

Microsoft recently announced that Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Exchange Server 2010 had been released to web, prompting an immediate upgrade rush for all of us Exchange professionals. Most of us maintain at least one home/personal lab environment, the better to pre-break things before setting foot on a customer site. Before you go charging out to do this for production (especially if you’re one of my customers, or don’t want to run the risk of suddenly becoming one of my customers), take a few minutes to learn about some of the current issues with SP1.

Easy Installation and Upgrade Slipstreaming

One thing that I love about Exchange service packs is that from Exchange 2007 on, they’re full installations in their own right. Ready to deploy a brand new Exchange 2010 SP1 server? Just run setup from the SP1 binaries – no more fiddling around with the original binaries, then applying your service packs. Of course, the Update Rollups now take the place of that, but there’s a mechanism to slipstream them into the installer (and here is the Exchange 2007 version of this article).

Note: If you do make use of the slipstream capabilities, remember that Update Rollups are both version-dependent (tied to the particular RTM/SP release level) and are cumulative. SP1 UR4 is not the same thing as RTM UR4! However, RTM UR4 will include RTM UR3, RTM UR2, and RTM UR1…just as SP1 UR4 will contain SP1 UR3, SP1 UR2, and SP1 UR1.

The articles I linked to say not to slipstream the Update Rollups with a service pack, and I’ve heard some confusion about what this means. It’s simple: you can use the Updates folder mechanism to slipstream the Update Rollups when you are performing a clean install. You cannot use the slipstream mechanism when you are applying a service pack to an existing Exchange installation. In the latter situation, apply the service pack, then the latest Update Rollup.

It’s too early for any Update Rollups for Exchange 2010 SP1 to exist at the time of writing, but if there were (for the sake of illustration, let’s say that SP1 UR X just came out), consider these two scenarios:

  • You have an existing Exchange 2010 RTM UR4 environment and want to upgrade directly to SP1 UR1. You would do this in two steps on each machine: run the SP1 installer, then run the latest SP1 UR X installer.
  • You now want to add a new Exchange 2010 server into your environment and want it to be at the same patch level. You could perform the installation in a single step from the SP1 binaries by making sure the latest SP1 UR X installer was in the Updates folder.

If these scenarios seem overly complicated, just remember back to the Exchange 2003 days…and before.

Third Party Applications

This might surprise you, but in all of the current Exchange 2010 projects I’m working on, I’ve not even raised the question of upgrading to SP1 yet. Why would I not do that? Simple – all of these environments have dependencies on third-party software that is not yet certified for Exchange 2010 SP1. In some cases, the software has barely just been certified for Exchange 2010 RTM! If the customer brings it up, I always encourage them to start examining SP1 in the lab, but for most production environments, supportability is a key requirement.

Make sure you’re not going to break any applications you care about before you go applying service packs! Exchange service packs always make changes – some easy to see, some harder to spot. You may need to upgrade your third-party applications, or you may simply need to make configuration changes ahead of time – but if you blindly apply service packs, you’ll find these things out the hard way. If you have a critical issue or lack of functionality that the Exchange 2010 SP1 will address, get it tested in your lab and make sure things will work.

Key applications I encourage my customers to test include:

Applications that use SMTP submission are typically pretty safe, and there are other applications that you might be okay living without if something does break. Figure out what you can live with, test them (or wait for certifications), and go from there.

Complications and Gotchas

Unfortunately, not every service pack goes smoothly. For Exchange 2010 SP1, one of the big gotchas that early adopters are giving strong feedback about is the number of hotfixes you must download and apply to Windows and the .NET Framework before applying SP1 (a variable number, depending on which base OS your Exchange 2010 server is running).

Having to install hotfixes wouldn’t be that bad if the installer told you, “Hey, click here and here and here to download and install the missing hotfixes.” Exchange has historically not done that (citing boundaries between Microsoft product groups) even though other Microsoft applications don’t seem to be quite as hobbled. However, this instance of (lack of) integration is particularly egregious because of two factors.

Factor #1: hotfix naming conventions. Back in the days of Windows 2000, you knew whether a hotfix was meant for your system, because whether you were running Workstation or Server, it was Windows 2000. Windows XP and Windows 2003 broke that naming link between desktop and server operating systems, often confusingly so once 64-bit versions of each were introduced (32-bit XP and 32-bit 2003 had their own patch versions, but 64-bit XP applied 64-bit 2003 hotfixes).

Then we got a few more twists to deal with. For example, did you know that Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 are the same codebase under the hood? Or that Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, likewise, are BFFs? It’s true. Likewise, the logic behind the naming of Windows Server 2003 R2 and Windows Server 2008 R2 were very different; Windows Server 2003 R2 was basically Windows Server 2003 with a SP and few additional components, while Windows Server 2008 R2 has some substantially different code under the hood than Windows Server 2008 with SP. (I would guess that Windows Server 2008 R2 got the R2 moniker to capitalize on Windows 2008’s success, while Windows 7 got a new name to differentiate itself from the perceived train wreck that Vista had become, but that’s speculation on my part.)

At any rate, figuring out which hotfixes you need – and which versions of those hotfixes – is less than easy. Just remember that you’re always downloading the 64-bit patch, and that Windows 2008=Vista while Windows 2008 R2=Windows 7 and you should be fine.

Factor #2: hotfix release channels. None of these hotfixes show up under Windows Update. There’s no easy installer or tool to run that gets them for you. In fact, at least two of the hotfixes must be obtained directly from Microsoft Customer Support Services. All of these hotfixes include scary legal boilerplate about not being fully regression tested and thereby not supported unless you were directly told to install them by CSS. This has caused quite a bit of angst out in the Exchange community, enough so that various people are collecting the various hotfixes and making them available off their own websites in one easy package to download[1].

I know that these people mean well and are trying to save others from a frustrating experience, but in this case, the help offered is a bad idea. That same hotfix boilerplate means that everyone who downloads those hotfixes agree not to redistribute those hotfixes. There’s no exception for good intentions. If you think this is bogus, let me give you two things to think about:

  • You need to be able to verify that your hotfixes are legitimate and haven’t been tampered with. Do you really want to trust production mission-critical systems to hotfixes you scrounged from some random Exchange pro you only know through blog postings? Even if the pro is trustworthy, is their web site? Quite frankly, I trust Microsoft’s web security team to prevent, detect, and mitigate hotfix-affecting intrusions far more quickly and efficiently than some random Exchange professional’s web host. I’m not disparaging any of my colleagues out there, but let’s face it – we have a lot more things to stay focused on. Few of us (if any) have the time and resources the Microsoft security guys do.
  • Hotfixes in bundles grow stale. When you link to a KB article or Microsoft Download offering to get a hotfix, you’re getting the most recent version of that hotfix. Yes, hotfixes may be updated behind the scenes as issues are uncovered and testing results come in. In the case of the direct-from-CSS hotfixes, you can get them for free through a relatively simple process. As part of that process, Microsoft collects your contact info so they can alert you if any issues later come up with the hotfix that may affect you. Downloading a stale hotfix from a random bundle increases the chances of getting an old hotfix version that may cause issues in your environment, costing you a support incident. How many of these people are going to update their bundles as new hotfix versions become available? How quickly will they do it – and how will you know?

The Exchange product team has gotten an overwhelming amount of feedback on this issue, and they’ve responded on their blog. Not only do they give you a handy table rounding up links to get the hotfixes, they also collect a number of other potential gotchas and advice to learn from from before beginning your SP1 deployment. Go check it out, then start deploying SP1 in your lab.

Good luck, and have fun! SP1 includes some killer new functionality, so take a look and enjoy!

[1] If you’re about to deploy a number of servers in a short period of time, of course you should cache these downloaded hotfixes for your team’s own use. Just make sure that that you check back occasionally for updated versions of the hotfixes. The rule of thumb I’d use is about a week – if I’m hitting my own hotfix cache and it’s older than a week, it’s worth a couple of minutes to make sure it’s still current.

2 Comments

  1. Coraleigh Hine

    Thank you for posting this! I did SP1 a few days ago and like others ran into the missing Powershell issue. :-p I did a workaround involving copying the ps1 files, plus I did some registry mods. I like Microsoft’s workaround on this issue better, and the Exchange Powershell runs cleaner now as well. :-)

    Also, if anyone’s interested, my Rightfax 9.4 FP1 w/SR2 Connector for Exchange is still working perfectly with Ex2010 SP1. My backup software “I365 Evault InfoStage” however still has not come up with a backup client for even the Ex2010 RTM.


  2. No problem, Coraleigh! Glad to hear it was useful in pointing you towards useful information. :)

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