Manually creating a DAG FSW for Exchange 2010

I just had a comment from Chris on my Busting the Exchange Trusted Subsystem Myth post that boiled down to asking what you do when you have to create the FSW for an Exchange 2010 DAG manually?

In order for this to be true, you have to have the following conditions:

  1. You have no other Exchange 2010 servers in the AD site. This implies that at least one of your DAG nodes is multi-role — remember that you need to have a CAS role and an HT role in the same site as your MB roles, preferably two or more of each for redundancy and load. If you have another Exchange 2010 server, then it’s already got the correct permissions — let Exchange manage the FSW automatically.
  2. If the site in question is part of a DAG that stretches sites, there are more DAG nodes in this site than in the second site. If you’re trying to place the FSW in the site with fewer members, you’re asking for trouble[1].
  3. You have no other Windows 2003 or 2008 servers in the site that you consider suitable for Exchange’s automatic FSW provisioning[2]. By this, I mean you’re not willing to the the Exchange Trusted Subsystem security group to the server’s local Administrators group so that Exchange can create, manage, and repair the FSW on its own. If your only other server in the site is a DC, I can understand not wanting to add the group to the Domain Admins group.

If that’s the case, and you’re dead set on doing it this way, you will have to manually create the FSW yourself. A FSW consists of two pieces: the directory, and the file share. The process for doing this is not documented anywhere on TechNet that I could find with a quick search, but happily, one Rune Bakkens blogs the following process:

To pre-create the FSW share you need the following:
- Create a folder etc. D:\FilesWitness\DAGNAME
- Give the owner permission to Exchange Trusted Subsystem
- Give the Exchange Trusted Subsystem Full Control (NTFS)
- Share the folder with the following DAGNAME.FQDN (If you try a different share name,
it won’t work. This is somehow required)
- Give the DAGNAME$ computeraccount Full Control (Share)

When you’ve done this, you can run the set-databaseavailabilitygroup -witnessserver CLUSTERSERVER – witnessdirectory D:\Filewitness\DAGNAME

You’ll get the following warning message:

WARNING: Specified witness server Cluster.fqdn is not an Exchange server, or part of the Exchange Servers security group.
WARNING: Insufficient permission to access file shares on witness server Cluster.fqdn. Until this problem is corrected, the database availability group may be more vulnerable to failures. You can use the set-databaseavailabilitygroup cmdlet to try the operation again. Error: Access is denied

This is expected, since the cmdlet tries to create the folder and share, but don’t have the permissions to do this.

When this is done, the FSW should be configured correct. To verify this, the following files should be created:

- VerifyShareWriteAccess
- Witness

Just for the record, I have not tested this process yet. However, I’ve had to do some recent FSW troubleshooting lately and this matches with what I’ve seen for naming conventions and permissions, so I’m fairly confident this should get you most of the way there. Thank you, Rune!

Don’t worry, I haven’t forgotten the next installment of my Exchange 2010 storage series. It’s coming, honest!

[1] Consider the following two-site DAG scenarios:

  • If there’s an odd number of MB nodes, Exchange won’t use the FSW.
  • An even number (n) of nodes in each site. The FSW is necessary for there to even be a quorum (you have 2n+1 nodes so a simple majority is n+1). If you lose the FSW and one other node — no matter where that node is — you’ll lose quorum. If you lose the link between sites, you lose quorum no matter where the FSW is.
  • A number (n) nodes in site A, with at least one fewer nodes (m) in site B. If n+m is odd, you have an odd number of nodes — our first case. Even if m is only 1 fewer than n, putting the FSW in site B is meaningless — if you lose site A, B will never have quorum (in this case, m+1 = n, and n is only half — one less than quorum).

I am confident in this case that if I’ve stuffed up the math here, someone will come along to correct me. I’m pretty sure I’m right, though, and now I’ll have to write up another post to show why. Yay for you!

[2] You do have at least one other Windows server in that site, though, right — like your DC? Exchange doesn’t like not having a DC in the local site — and that DC should also be a GC.

7 Comments





  1. leonardo

    THANKS A LOT, i lost hours trying to make it work, Thanks!

  2. Bukkabukka

    “The process for doing this is not documented anywhere on TechNet that I could find with a quick search, but happily, one Rune Bakkens blogs the following process:”, the link within no longer works, “This Windows Live Space is no longer available’

  3. clebrwn

    THANKS!!!
    I tried to find solution but I cant find enywhere.

    Your solution works!

    I cant understand why doesnt document these steps the technet……..

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